Sammar clung to the barrel, struggling to climb atop of it in the swirling water. He wasn’t having much luck. The hulk of the galley loomed above him at a crazy angle, illuminated for a half moment by a flash of lightning. Its after-image seemed burned into his eye in the darkness, but when the next brilliant blast came, the ship was gone.

“Help me!” a voice cried from nearby, and Sammar looked to see one of the deck hands flailing about, trying to keep his head above the surface. Sammar wondered how the sailor, probably not more than fifteen years old, had managed to get his job without knowing how to swim.

Before he could reflect upon his own inability to last long on the open sea in a raging storm, the deck hand was suddenly vanished below the surface. Horrified, Sammar was certain that it wasn’t merely a case of the man succumbing to the sea, but that he had been pulled below. And though he couldn’t even begin to imagine how it was possible, it had looked as if the man had been illuminated (from within?) by a lightning of his own…

Shocktopus

No. Enc.: 0 (1)
Alignment: Chaotic (Evil)
Movement: Swim: 90 (30)
Armor Class: 6 [13]
Hit Dice: 8
Attacks: 8 (tentacles)
Damage: 1 (per tentacle) plus shock
Save: F8
Morale: 8
Hoard Class: None

These solitary creatures are territorial and very aggressive. The size of standard giant octopi, their eight 10-foot arms are, in fact, electric eels. Each bite inflicts one point of damage plus an additional 1d6+1 if a saving throw vs. breath weapon is failed.

The eel arms cannot inflict constriction damage like a standard octopus, but the shocktopus is able to emit a 40′ cloud of ink and flee at three times standard speed if it is losing an encounter.

(White Box) Shocktopus: HD: 8; AC 6 [13]; Atk 8 tentacles (1 + shock); Move 9; Save 10;

5 Comments to “Shocktopus
–Monday Monster”

  1. bat says:

    Nice creature. I just want to underscore that I hate marine life (from a series of odd encounters that began when I was 8, with an octopus, no less) and this just reinforces my fear and hatred of things from the sea. Well done.

    • Kilgore says:

      I’ve always thought that if you don’t hate and fear things from the depths, it’s only because you haven’t given the subject enough thought.

  2. Timeshadows says:

    All good comments.
    –I too have a very healthy, um, respect of the sea.

    “It freaks me out, man!!!”