A post over on the Goblinoid Games board reminded me that I wanted to post our weapons table:


Weapon Cost Damage
Axe, Battle # 6 gp 1d8
Axe, Hand 2 gp 1d6
Bow 25 gp 1d6
Bow, Long 40 gp 1d6
Club 1 gp 1d4
Crossbow 16 gp 1d4
Crossbow, Heavy 25 gp 1d6
Dagger 3 gp 1d4
Dagger, Silver 30 gp 1d4
Dart 5 sp 1d4
Flail 3 gp 1d6
Flail, Heavy * 8 gp 1d8
Hammer 1 gp 1d4
Hammer, War # 5 gp 1d6
Javelin 1 gp 1d6
Lance 7 gp 1d6
Mace 7 gp 1d6
Morningstar # 6 gp 1d6
Pick @ 8 gp 1d6/1d8
Pole Arm * 7 gp 1d8
Sling 2 gp 1d4
Spear @ 3 gp 1d6/1d8
Staff * 2 gp 1d6
Sword 10 gp 1d8
Sword, Bastard @ 20 gp 1d8/1d10
Sword, Short 7 gp 1d6
Sword, Two-Handed * 15 gp 1d10
Trident @ 4 gp 1d4/1d6
* Two-handed weapons # Two-handed weapons, can be wielded one-handed with STR 11+ @ Can be wielded one-handed/two-handed

Nothing terribly unusual, though we’ve simplified things a bit and tweaked a few. We’ve made the pick, spear, and trident all optionally one- or two-handed like the bastard sword. And we’ve made a few weapons two-handed for those with STR of 10 or less but one-handed for characters with STR 11+.

Finally, the bow, crossbow, and sword are just that unless of a non-standard design. Meaning that normal one-handed swords are “swords,” not “long swords.” And most bows are just “bows,” with the large heavy bows “long bows.” We’re more or less treating long bows as the pole arms of bows, with (short) bows being the standard. “Sword” includes scimitars and broad swords.

We want some sort of penalty for using pole arms, long bows, and (probably) two-handed swords indoors or in close quarters, but haven’t quite figured out exactly how we’re going to do it.

If anyone’s got any critiques or suggestions, I’d be glad to hear them.

UPDATE: I’ve decided to go with d4/d6 damage for the trident wielded one/two handed and give it (and the staff) a +1 bonus when used to parry. We want to be as “realistic” as possible while also having mechanical differences. If a trident does the same damage as a spear AND gets a parry bonus, who would use a spear?

Tags:

15 Comments to “And My Axe!”

  1. David says:

    I like the optional 1 handed for those with a high enough strength.

    As for a penalty, perhaps a simple -1 or -2 to hit for large weapons in cramped conditions?

    • Kilgore says:

      For the 1-handed use, maybe require that it be designed for such. As in, a long-handled battle axe can’t just be wielded one handed by a guy with STR 12, he has to have a short-hafted battle axe.

      And dwarves would need shorter battle axes in any event. Or not, if that gets too much to worry about.

  2. Erin says:

    I second David’s comment – the option for 1-handed use with 11+ STR is a great idea.

    My suggestion for using 2-handed weapons indoors is to reduce attack frequency to 1 every other round, but no additional penalty.

    One item: I noticed that the damage dice for “1-handed/2-handed” weapons goes up by one step, though trident goes from 1d6 to 1d10. Am I reading that right?

    • Kilgore says:

      Whoops! Now I remember one of the reasons I hadn’t posted this before…we hadn’t decided on the trident’s damage. LOL.

      I think it should be greater than the spear (1d6/1d8) because of the three points, but I also think 1d8/1d10 is too high.

      We’re also trying to avoid +1s on the damage numbers and use straight 1-die rolls. So we’re waffling on it.

      • Erin says:

        My limited knowledge of the trident suggests that damage should be on par with the spear. My understanding is that the tines were more about catching hold of an opponent’s weapon than doing damage to a foe. But that speaks to parrying, which is an entirely new mechanic.

        Though…in my B/X campaign, I used to represent parrying weapons by giving the wielder a +1 AC bonus vs. swung melee weapons. This worked well, was seamless in play, and gave some flair to certain arms.

        • Kilgore says:

          That makes sense about the tines. Maybe trident = spear is what we’ll do.

          I’m tempted to use a parry-type rule where a successful to-hit roll indicates you parry the opponent’s blow. Some weapons would get a +1 bonus to parry. Not sure about it and have never tried it in play. Not even sure if I want to use a parry rule at all.

          • Erin says:

            From experience, parry is a cool addition for differentiating weapons, but once you start modifying attacker “to-hit” instead of defender AC, it can get cumbersome.

            Another option we toyed with: if you have a parrying weapon, you successfully parry if (and only if) your foe’s attack roll equals the require “to-hit” roll. That is, I need a 17 to hit you – if I roll a 17 and you have a parrying weapon, the hit becomes a miss.

            Not stellar, but enough to represent the parry without inventing new mechanics.

  3. bighara says:

    To KISS, I’d keep Trident = Spear damage. For big weapons in tight quarters, I’d either give them a to-hit or go with the old initiative penalty.

  4. ChicagoWiz says:

    We want some sort of penalty for using pole arms, long bows, and (probably) two-handed swords indoors or in close quarters, but haven’t quite figured out exactly how we’re going to do it.

    At Winterwar this year, Jeff Rients ran EPT. One of the things he did that I’ve since used in my games is the concept that people can be 3 abreast in a 10′ corridor or space. If you’re swinging a polearm or 2-handed weapon, you can only be 2 abreast. I like it a lot. I count spears with this as well.

  5. Timeshadows says:

    What is the advantage od using a Bastard sword with both hands?
    –I don’t see it listed.

    • Erin Smale says:

      You’ll inflict 1d10 damage with 2 hands (1d8 if 1-handed).

      • Kilgore says:

        Exactly.

        EDIT: I’ve actually considered dropping the bastard sword or the 2-handed sword. In fact, I’ve tossed out the idea of making all (non short-) swords basically 1d8/1d10 for one/two handed use and dropping BOTH bastard and 2-handed swords. But haven’t quite made that leap yet.

  6. Timeshadows says:

    Wow, thanks.
    –I completely missed the dual value.
    :: duh ::